Dissected Procedural Anatomy-Upper Limb

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The Dissected Procedural Anatomy courses are one day courses intended for surgical trainees and consultants. The courses are heavily laboratory-based: attendees get ample opportunity to dissect real cadaveric specimens under the expert guidance of Monash University anatomists and supporting consultant surgeons.

DPA - UPPER LIMB is intended for plastic and orthopaedic surgery trainees (and consultants) wishing to revisit their upper limb anatomy. DPA courses focus on, and start each dissection with, specific incisions so that the anatomy covered is directly related to clinical use. Unique dissection sequences have been developed for each starting incision, allowing attendees to explore the anatomy surrounding each incision, highlighting at-risk structures and key relations.

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the anatomy encountered in a number of core approaches to the upper limb
  • Describe the anatomy surrounding each core approach, with an emphasis of structures at risk.
  • Improved understanding of current advances in anatomical research
  • Improved dissection skills

This course uses real human cadaveric donors. Attendees will spend the majority of the course dissecting in pairs and therefore should be prepared for a large amount of hands-on work. Each pair will have one limb to work on throughout the day. All donors are soft-embalmed to ensure good joint and tissue mobility, without the complications of unembalmed tissue.

Topics Covered

This one day course will be divided into FOUR sessions, with some flexibility accounting for difference in attendee experience.

1. Introduction

Following a brief overview of laboratory OH&S requirements, the concept underpinning the dissection approach will be described. Advice on dissection technique and boundaries of dissection for each session will be clearly outlined.

2. Arm and Forearm

The two morning sessions will begin following a brief lecture on the starting incisions and their related procedures. Anatomy of particular importance in each dissection will be highlighted.

3. Dissection Session 1 – The Arm

This session is for dissection of arm approaches. Attendees will be in pairs on a single cadaveric limb.  Each session will have enough time for each attendee to do at least one dissection (two per session per limb).  Pairs may choose from the following approaches:

  • anterior approach to the humeral shaft
  • anterolateral approach to the distal humerus*
  • lateral arm flap*
  • posterior approach to the distal humerus

*generally not preferred on the same limb.

4. Dissection Session 2 – The Elbow and Forearm

This session is for dissection of elbow and/or forearm approaches. Attendees will be in pairs on a single cadaveric limb.  Each session will have enough time for each attendee to do at least one dissection (two per session per limb).  Pairs may choose from the following approaches:

  • medial approach to the elbow
  • posterior approach to the elbow
  • anterior approach to the cubital fossa
  • Becker (ulno-dorsal) perforator flap
  • radial forearm flap
  • posterior interosseous artery flap

5. Wrist and Hand

The two afternoon sessions will begin following a brief lecture on the starting incisions and their related procedures. Anatomy of particular importance in each dissection will be highlighted.

6. Dissection Session 3 – The Wrist

This session is for dissection of wrist approaches. Attendees will be in pairs on a single cadaveric limb.  Each session will have enough time for each attendee to do at least one dissection (two per session per limb).  Pairs may choose from the following approaches:

  • dorsal approach to the wrist*
  • palmar approach to the wrist
  • palmar approach to the ulnar nerve
  • DeQuervain’s release
  • dorso-lateral approach to the scaphoid

7. Dissection Session 4 – The Hand

This session is for dissection of hand approaches. Attendees will be in pairs on a single cadaveric limb.  Each session will have enough time for each attendee to do at least one dissection (two per session per limb).  Pairs may choose from the following approaches:

  • palmar approach to the flexor tendons
  • Foucher (FDMA) flap
  • digital Z-plasty
  • radial forearm flap

Any additional time will be used to complete previous dissections, or start new ones.

Dr Quentin Fogg

Dr Quentin Fogg

Dr Quentin Fogg is an anatomist with broad range of experiences and areas of expertise. He has more than 17 very full years of experience teaching anatomy. He completed his BSc(Hons) in Anatomy and PhD (clinical anatomy of the wrist) at the University of Adelaide under the supervision of Ray Tedman and Greg Bain.  He gained further experience teaching at the SA College of Natural Medicine and the University of South Australia, and training in embalming and mortuary management. These experiences led him to a lectureship at Flinders University. He then took up a teaching position at the American University of the Caribbean, where he revitalised the anatomy programme.  In late 2007 he was appointed the William Hunter Lecturer in Anatomy at the University of Glasgow. In Glasgow he led the refurbishment of the anatomy facilities, led the expansion of the Body Donor Programme, and was heavily involved in the rewriting of the anatomy component of the new medical curriculum. He also had a leading role in the establishment of a world-class training facility, the Clinical Anatomy Skills Centre (CASC), in association with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.  He was involved in the design and delivery of many of the courses offered at CASC. Quentin’s research in topographic anatomy has included numerous collaborations with clinicians, particularly in orthopaedics and plastic surgery; his lab provides numerous opportunities for Honours and Graduate students. He is also well known for his work in donor preparation and management. He has published more than 40 papers and presented at a wide variety of anatomical and surgical conferences internationally. He has been an invited speaker at international conferences and is regularly invited to set up and deliver surgical anatomy courses. In 2013 his work in clinical anatomy was recognised by election to Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Quentin was featured in the two-part documentary series “Dissected” on BBC4 in 2014, along with a programme about Leonardo Da Vinci (BBC2, 2013) and another  about the Hunter brothers (BBC4, 2014). Quentin joined the Centre for Human Anatomy Education at Monash University in January 2015 and is committed to expanding the number and variety of postgraduate anatomy courses available in Melbourne

More Information
Contact Name Mati Chinyanda
Contact Email mihce-inquiries@monash.edu
Contact Phone +61 3 9905 5112